Students craft the past during camp

Students craft the past during  camp
by:  Mark Andrews   The Daily Tribune  News
Caroline Lanier carefully paints a pattern on her stick creature at Tuesday’s Bartow History Museum “Crafting the Past” children’s camp. The camp included crafts and games. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News

Caroline Lanier carefully paints a pattern on her  stick creature at Tuesday’s Bartow History Museum “Crafting the Past” children’s  camp. The camp included crafts and games. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune  News

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Bartow History Museum staffer Kristi Ferguson helps Greg Olson get his tree tapestry started. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News

Bartow History Museum staffer Kristi Ferguson helps  Greg Olson get his tree tapestry started. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune  News

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Children from across Bartow County on Monday  and Tuesday were given the opportunity to experience activities and games from  the pioneer past as the Bartow History Museum held its “Crafting the Past” winter break camp.
Susan Yark with Bartow History Museum explained the  intent of the two-day camp was to help children see how youth in pioneer days  created their own toys and games. The camp also involved some modern aspects for  participants.
“We learned that kids in the past played with sticks, so we  painted a base coat on [sticks] and put decorations and yarn wigs on them and,  of course, the googly eyes,” Yark said.
Other activities included  weaving, candle dipping and a tour of the museum.
“[It’s important] to  recognize the difference of what happens now and what happened in the past,” Yark said. “And the chores they had to do, like candlemaking — it’s fun for us,  but [pioneers] had to do it once a year for the whole year’s lighting of their  cabin.”
Camp participants also played games, such as the Cherokee bean  dice game and a Cherokee game called “firekeeper.”
“[Firekeeper] uses  craft sticks that are painted to look like fire. We take a bandanna hankerchief  and put it around the eyes as a blindfold for the firekeeper,” Yark said. “The  other children try to steal a stick one at a time and the Cherokee children  learned how to be quiet when they were hunting.”
While the camp taught  from the past, a modern craft — the Styrofoam and yarn octopus — was the crowd  favorite for Tuesday, which included children ages 7 to 11. Monday’s camp was  geared toward children ages 4 to 6.
“We’ve been making arts and crafts,  weaving, and we’ve made candles and stuff like that. It’s been a lot of fun,” Euharlee Elementary School third-grader Dylan Hankins said.
Both Hankins  and fellow camp participant Cody Stewart, a fourth-grader at Taylorsville  Elementary School, said they enjoyed crafting the Styrofoam and yarn octopus as  well as playing and exploring in the museum’s history nook.
Program  volunteers and staff said one of the less popular activities was weaving,  leaving some children frustrated with the difficult nature of the activity and  unable to complete their project before the end of camp. However, that wasn’t  the case for Caroline Lanier, a third-grader at TES.
“Weaving was hard  … but that was my favorite part,” Lanier said. “I finished everything.”

Read more:  The Daily Tribune News – Students craft the past during camp

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